Friday, February 08, 2008

Second chances, no! Third chances and more? Yes!

I've no idea when the heck Spider-Man put everyone down, or where Jimmy Gordero happened to land (as I'm reasonably certain Spider-Man just tossed them off with little thought as to their personal well-being), but the speed at which he may have done so suggests he could have easily done so at any time. Spider-Man is also trying to regain his quipping ability, but he's not doing so well. Oh, and the second chances thing? Not so effective when you're talking to a guy that's escaped from you once and made a fool of your alter-ego as well.

On another note, I think that cop by Spider-Man's elbow might be dead. I think his neck might be broken. Nice job, Spider-Man.

3 comments:

jvwalt said...

So Godero is... umm... escaping right now? Well, probably he's sitting there, transfixed by the "action," waiting politely for Spider-Man to remember that he just inadvertently set a convict free.

And if you say that Spidey can only be expected to handle one thing at a time... I say, the Persuader is such an incredibly lame villain that Spidey ought to be able to defeat him with one hand. Shoot one web at Persuader, shoot the other at Godero.

Really, the Persuader reminds me of the very early days of "Superman," when they had Supes defeating garden-variety gangsters, hoodlums, and crooks. It was like shooting fish in a barrel. Or hunting flightless birds in an enclosed compound.

Anonymous said...

You know, if you took away the dialogue, and the context of why they are there, and changed the persuader's name to "carnage", this wouldn't be a bad comic strip.

Mike P said...

It's generally accepted that if you took out the lame, generic gangsters in this strip and put in name-brand villains, then it would be a lot better. Then again, by "a lot better" I mean it would have a name-brand villain in the strip.

I would like to see Stan Lee try his hand at writing Carnage for a family-friendly relative violence-free environment. This begs the question, though: in a comics page with the likes of Dick Tracy, how violent is too violent?